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turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of which woman
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
idea what he was saying. turner traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspi
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
't export to europe. but instead of talking about that, he lashed out an audience that was almost all jewish, he lashed out on him and he said you are a must stop making interest of the lead to a hitler from the great dictator, as he stopped making and a german, and i hit local antinazi films, you are going to cause the next war millions of american boys aren't bickel and blood will be spilled and will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism that this world has ever seen because everybody is going to win a remedy in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total absolute praia nobody wanted to touch him. nobody could join the first immunity and sign up with lynn burba but he didn't want to do that because he knew that if he did that, there would be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the marrec was part of the stories, the part i'm not going to be able to tell you the you will have to read in 1940 he was the kennedy name was dirty. it was dirt among the isolationists because kennedy didn't come out against roosevelt. again be
europe slip into the mediterranean. and so also given other asset classes equities appear to be relatively attractive. >> let's talk about that, actually. because did you ask the people that you survey what are the best asset csse and stks got-- was at the top of the list. let's look at the list here, followed by precious metals, commodities, bonds and cash at the bottom of the list. tell us a little bit pore about those rankings from investment managers? >> sure. and these are charter financial analysts that we survey, our members. they spend their time in the markets investing. and compared to last year, there is more pessimism about the prospect it's for bonds, for fixed income given the very low nominal level of yields. and also for cash where basically you cat get any return. equies we the clear favorite with over 50% of our respondents saying that they would be the best asset class. >> there is still some pessimism about europe, primarily coming from respondents, our members there. but there's more open coming from-- optimistic from charter financial analysts who are
of films. the film come is going to do if they could export to europe. but instead of talking about that, she lashed out at an audience that is almost all jewish. he lashed out at them and say stop making anti-hitler films. unless you stop taking anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you're going to cause the next work. boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled and there'll be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism in this world ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jew's. by 1940, he was a total absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if you wanted, he could have a chilling the america first community, signed up with lindbergh. but he didn't want to do that because he knew if he did that there'd be no place in politics for his children at her,, ever. so he stayed quiet. there are actually as part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be that tell you, that you're going to have to read. [laughter] in 1940, he was a kennedy name is in the dirt. it is dirt among the isolationists for kennedy to comment against
is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against
't know about double-digit earnings growth, but credit in europe, and a miracle in japan. it is incredible. earnings are starting to rebound because nominal gdp is increasing and the other thing about volatility, volatility is going lower making what could have been more tight, more stability going into next year. all of these things, they will have a great year as far as price concern. liz: we showed the s&p for the year up about 16% year-over-year. the nasdaq 17%, these are beautiful performances, can they continue through 2013? >> i got asked that question a lot. people say the market is up, they are expensive, that is not necessarily so. the market is up because the consumer confidence and spending and earnings are great and the stock market made up of individual stocks that represent corporate earnings. as i look out into 2013, i see a bunch of tailwind called the energy sector, the housing sector getting a lot better. i agree capital spending and manufacturing is making a renaissance in the u.s. and all that would achieve market make for good earnings. david: i brought it up with our
the difference between the u.s. and europe has produced almost no innovation. we produce almost all of it. we pulled their growth rate up because of the success in the united states. >> eliot: jeff i'll get to you in ten seconds. if taxes were 100%, people would theoretically sit at home. when we're talking about a rise from 35% to 39% -- >> they sit at home in europe. >> eliot:, here we have a database to say what has happened when we move them marginally from 35% to 39.6%. they were created when the rates were at 39.6%. i don't see the causation. >> i think your viewers have to be very aware of the nature of these academic studies. there have been leading economists who have looked at this inside and out. the congressional research service, i believe was asked by the republicans to take that down. they cannot find a correlation between higher tax rates and slower economic growth. just let me finish, okay? clinton raised the tax -- people like feldstein and barro to do the arithmetic will undermine economic growth, be pre
is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is very import
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent data out of europe, we will talk about in a minute what a day for the asian markets again. also coming up. our road map begins at andrews air force base where the president arrives in a couple of hours, cutting his hawaiian vacation short to address the fiscal cliff s there really any hope in the last attempt? does the market fade if there's no news tomorrow night? >> the nikkei continues its 21-month run. how much is the boj willing to put up with? >> looking a at potential strike in the nation's port on the east and southern coast, the first since '77 that could cost retailers and importers billions. businesses now asking its white house to get involved. >>> you can now get the nokia lumia for free, depending on the service provider contract you sign s that standard practice or a sign the company's flagship phone suspect selling well? >>> we will start off with news about the fiscal cliff. congress returning to capitol hill today to try to get a deal done on the cliff before the deadline on december 31st. senate majority leader harry rei
century europe. for them the past is not a dry affair but full of exciting people brave he rose and events that could teach us a great deal about our own time. here we decide to concentrate to make a history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest audience in the hope the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people today the same way those of the past inspired my parents brought a 50 anniversary of my father's inauguration. with a digital archive putting them on line so people all over the world could have access. so that kids could learn about the most important moments and reach translated into more than 40 languages. this is a combination of digitizing an amended tag the partnerships to make is the first presidential archive, a digital presidential archive. then my mother's oral histories seven -- seven conversations of have been sealed since 1964 and to commemorate the cuban missile crisis we publish a book called "listening in" the secret white house recordings of john f. kennedy." president kennedy takes to do 65 hours of meetings, conversations are private di
. >> that we're just relieved, and that you don't get the huge bounce. but europe is also tracking what we're doing here. as it should really. our economy is much more important to the globe than what happens in any of those little economies over there. the shares drifting higher in early trading on expectations that a budget deal is closer. in asia, japan's nikkei rising above the 10,000 mark, wow, the first time in more than eight months. still a ways from 50,000. among the catalysts, expectations of more aggressive monetary stimulus from the bank of japan. the boj wraps up a two-day meeting with a policy announcement tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
into what you think your version should be for adopting the paa that's why europe into asia because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it was not designed to be in the long term missile ballistic architecture. there's benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have diminished because they are mature of enough to have it. as far as the intercepters to be productive, you have to look across the technologies that we pursue, and recognize that the significant technology challenges that have been associated with that program, and really, i think you have to -- in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've done the technology part of the -- of this ballistic missile defense have done amazing things in that time frame, t
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
these days. >> and i want to take a look at a longer term chart. in the midst of all this in europe and everywhere else, that is a chart that a lot of people would be envious of. jim, we can't neglect what's happening today in washington. has it affected you at all? have you made any plans? are you doing anything based on what these publioliticians are wrangling' about? >> certainly, it's slowed our growth. >> it has? >> in the couple of years, it's slowed even faster. government was weaker than normal for the quarter and i think we'll see that going forward a bit. it's hurting for us. we have a lot of cash, we have no debt. so it's not a major, major impact. certainly the lack of clarity is hurting our customers and that ultimately affects us, as well. >> so you do business with the government and also the uncertainty around the policy has affected some of your customers to some extend? >> oh, absolutely. now, we sell a high valued proposition, so we do well in downed markets. so at the same time it's hurt us with some government customers. overall, the lack of certainty has led pe
in europe and we will go back. host: in 1940, mid 1940, he is prime minister of great britain. how big at that stage is the british empire? guest: well, it covered gee graphicically about a quarter of the left-hand mass and -- land mass and population. the population was about a quarter of the earth. india, subcontinent. commonwealth and dominion, canada, new zealand, ulster, northern ireland. host: hong kong, singapore? guest: oh, yes. host: how about africa? guest: they had a relationship with egypt. i thought going into this that they sort of controlled egypt. but the treaty allowed them to go in and administer the country or safeguard the suez canal and they did that. they had in south africa jan smuts and the republic of south africa. they had some somali land, some territories there that the italians just plucked from them. they were completely unprepared everywhere for war. and i think the british army plus the australian army of five or six divisions, new zealand and the canadians, all of them put together, even if they could all get it england were outnumbered by lhitler's arm
in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints, kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact, upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation, thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet, so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their hopes were going to be realized. and so it really did put a lot of people in motion during
: i have seen people wait an hour to see, in effect words. if you go to ancient cathedrals in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their
of the hotel he was staying in. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains down
to talk to them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school. but england, europe, undergraduate. so these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. maybe 80 people are i said i'm just a scared he to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking, and a student raised her hand, and she said, now checks and balances is very important in your constitution and the present checks -- who protects, who checks the coats? good question. not sure i had a satisfactory answer. [laughter] there is an answer. and another student raised his hand, and he said federalism is very important in america. but money goes to washington, and then it goes to the states with conditions. with grants and eight. doesn't this undermine federalism? in a student raised her hand and said now, chief justice john marshall was very much admired in the united states. for all his decisions popular when he wrote them? i said wait, stop. [laughter] i said, you knew i was coming. you
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
in their friday trading. most by about 1%. markets across europe were also weaker in early trading. we'll have a lot more of this coming up later in the broadcast. >>> and the nation pauses today to remember those killed just one week ago in newtown. >> what a remarkable week it's been. among those is the first lady, who has written a letter in this morning's "hartford courant." she writes, may the memories of those beautiful children and those heroic adults be a blessing for your community and for our country. >> and for more on the somber ceremonies, we're joined by wendy gillette in newtown. good morning, wendy. >> reporter: good morning, rob and sunny. newtown is a very different place. one week ago, at this time, it was a different place. a quiet, small town where violence was extremely rare. now, as the nation continues to heal after the massacre, many will pause this morning to remember what was lost. bells across connecticut will toll 26 times at 9:30 this morning, marking the exact moment when terror invaded sandy hook elementary school. governor dan malloy called for a moment of sile
between a very rich oligarch. the problems of what you have in europe, the most successful countries like switzerland, norway, 90% is a successful middle-class. they must develop the middle class. it is impossible to build a democratic country, a tolerant country that is ready to coexist. >> you cannot move to scandinavia. that is not one of the options for israel. let me ask you this question. as opposed from lurching from conference to conference, when you think over a 10-year or 20- year horizon, given your pessimism about the palestinians, think about it further out. what is it that we in america are helping you attain? is it to continue the status quo? is it to have a negotiated peace? >> i completely agree with you that the first real and crucial mistake was from moses, that he brought us to the middle east. we are in the middle east. in the middle east, there is no coincidence that we have only one vibrant democracy. the state of israel them that despite all of our challenges. you see what happens now in syria and even in iraq, in egypt. despite all the challenges, we are still a v
with nutrients. and considered fine dining. and always have been in europe. >> always have been in europe. but the u.s. has been squeamish about those types of meat. >> not anymore. >> not anymore. >> but today, you have two dishes to start any meal. let's get started. the first one, is something with pomegranate. >> i want to start with chicories. they're bitter greens. most people have a beef or ham, a turkey. you want to have something that's going to be a little bitter that will cut that richness. so, we try to work with, you know, a little bit of bitter greens. this is your standard treviso. i'm going to cut that nice. really festive colors. really beautiful. >> and this is kosto franco. >> it likes -- >> i'm going to take out that core. watch out. i don't like to cut this green. i like to tear it. >> and you also have pomegranates. are these pistachios? >> these are pistachios. you have all these vibrant colors here. really simple. and now, pistachios are going to add a nut meat, fat protein to it. >> how do you get them out of the pomegranate? >> that is so hard. >> would you mind
? >> quite simply, europe looks so bad where would you put the money? alternative to --. lori: talking about that for a year now. there is no interest payment in u.s. bond. u.s. stocks are really a better return right now. >> well they are right now but if we go over the cliff you might not want to repeat that statement. cash might, a lot of people are going to have to move to cash if they really feel shaky about the u.s. government. but gold. we might see a boom in gold. lori: buy up that bullion. bury it in the backyard. real hard asset. >> just like french farmers. lori: no kidding. tracy: peter, you're great. have a happy new year. >> happy new year, friend. lori: i wasn't arguing with him. i was agreeing with him. tracy: you're question is a good one. where are the bond vigilantees? they have been gone for months now. lori: for years. tracy: for years, you're right, my goodness another housing bailout, the government backing up a plan to bail out underwater homeowners that may ultimately leave you on the hook. tracy: let's look how oil is trading as we head out to break. it is up almost
the measure -- the republican-dominate -- >>> europe's bank agreeing to pay a fine for anotherly -- for nearly two billion dollars and sorry for past mistakes. facebook making change to infrastructure. officials gathering today for start of two day meeting. fed will unleash new round of bond buying designed to keep interest rates low. higher close yesterday. if you are looking for a bargain now could be a good time to pick up a pick-up. general motors boosting buyer insensitives trying to dump extra stock and keep up with better deals on-ramps and nissan titans. at the new york stock exchange, i'm jane king. >>> 5:46. this afternoon as you drive home or after you get home and have dinner that you see the rain? >> may have a scout shower ahead, really going to be evening and overnight hours. until we get there we have transitions. you don't see it here we are looking south if we are looking north in the north bay, a lot of fog along 101 here crystal clear sky over san francisco. doppler is dry now. widen out the perspective near seattle that is tonight's weather, traveling that far to get here
but certainly this issue, i mean people are watching, i was talking to somebody today in europe and they were saying the only thing that is on the news there is whether the american politicians if you will are going to deal with this issue that is before us. so no doubt we are being made into lesser country he by virtue of our inability to deal with this. and greta, i think you know also that a month ago i offered a $4.5 trillion package to deal with this just so to show that these decisions are easy to make. tough medicine but easy to make. we know how they score and we should just get this behind us and i think what most of us wanted to see on our side of the aisle is putting this in the rear view mirror as we moved into january to begin the year again with an economy and investing public and a world that knew that we faced up to the responsibilities that we have in this great nation. again we stepped away from that and it is going to continue on but again i think our nation's greatness continues to dissipate as we digitter with the issue -- dither with an issue of the government growing in
of a gene use. jen use. it might make them so powerful no one in europe can stand up to this em. a century from now is not my problem. the news goes back. they take the news of the purchase back. the news arrives in boston. boston is the federalist tear toy. it's the opposition for the jefferson administration. that want to deprive jefferson of try yumple. they set off a fireworks display. it wasn't a controversial thing in american politics. no. american politicians were really enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jeff
, probably because it's pretty clear china is both a competitor and a partner. >> number 4, europe. the european union was fractured by too much debt and the us a trty plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. >> number 3, the housing market finally bottomed out. the combination of low home prices and continued record low mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. investors began buying entire neighborhoods but first-time buyers were also able to get a home of their own for the first time in years. as long as they had a hefty down payment. >> number 2. >> cnn projects that barack obama will be reelected president of the united states. >> the next. more than just about obama and romney. it was about socialism and capitali capitalism, about what kind of role government should have in your life. >> number 1 is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. >> so those are the top 10 business stori
and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest possible audience. in the hope that the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people growing up today in the same way the stories of the past spired my parents. on the 50th anniversary of my father's inauguration, in january 2001, we launched the digital archive from putting all the presents papers and correspondence and memos and photograph and film online, so that people can have access online to this material. not just scholars who come to boston. we created the president's desk, an interactive tool, so that kids can experience most important moments of the presidency. and we translated my father's major addresses into 40 languages online. this is the culmination of digitizing and creating the
at the vatican. about 40,000 young pilgrims from all across europe attended an open air mass conducted by pope benedict. they cheered as the pope waved to the crowd from his popemobile and the crowd gathered in st. peter's square, part of a mission to promote peace. time now for the weather and over to ginger zee. >> i had to start out with pure cuteness on this one. we have to head to rhode island where they had some snow last night in some places quite a bit enemma claire is experiencing it for the first time. yes, her dad just wanted to send us a little ireport and let us know how emma -- she is very fascinated he said. she gets down, starting touching it and playing with it. many more years of snow if you're staying in rhode island. thanks for sending that. another storm to watch for. now the other one has moved off the northeast and through new england, parts of north texas and the western part of oklahoma now with some winter weather add advisories in place. it's going to dampen out as it heads to the east. quite a bit of rain from dallas and parts of the gulf eventually. so as far as ne
the fiscal cliff here in the united states. >> we still have those concerns. let's focus on europe. you have the european stock averages down. the eu markets are down because the italian prime minister announced over the weekend he will resign early. earlier than had been expected. and also we got new economic data that showed japan has slipped into a technical recession. they looked at their numbers. they revised the data. japan is technically in a recession. you have more uncertainty in italy. one of the important countries. and also you have this concern happening in japan. we have this week, ben bernanke and the fed will meet at a two-day fed meeting. a lot of people are hoping to hear from the federal reserve chief that there will be some kind of on going stimulus in the form of, you know, bond buybacks or something. we'll be looking to see what he has to say about the economy. this is another big uncertainty in the markets for the week. you know, this comes after consumer spending showing as "the wall street journal" set this morning, consumer spending, consumer confidence wabbling. th
the coast of georgia and battles in canada and western europe, all over the place but again the majority of battles are fought here. the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, they are losses and the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are migration. so that is probably the number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other extraordinary thing you say is 8000 rebels were killed in action. 11,000 died in the prison ships. most of those are in new york. one ship has 7000. >> i think a total of the two prison ships that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after th
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